(270) 769-3990
804 N Mulberry St Elizabethtown, KY 42701-1922

Posts for: January, 2014

By Dyer Family Dentistry
January 28, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral health  
TechniqueJustasImportantWithPoweredToothbrushesasWithManual

Electric-powered toothbrushes have been in use for decades, and continue to enjoy wide popularity. But since their inception in the 1950s, there’s been a continuous debate not only about the best choice among powered toothbrushes, but whether powered toothbrushes are as effective in removing plaque as manual toothbrushes.

These debates are fueled by a large body of research over many years on powered toothbrushes. For instance, an independent research firm known as the Cochrane Collaboration has evaluated over 300 hundred studies of powered toothbrushes (over a thirty-year span) using international standards to analyze the data.

Surprisingly, they found only one type of powered toothbrush (using a rotation-oscillation action) that statistically outperformed manual toothbrushes in the reduction of plaque and gingivitis. Although from a statistical point of view the difference was significant, in practical terms it was only a modest increase in efficiency.

In all actuality, the most important aspect about toothbrushes in effective oral hygiene isn’t the brush, but how it’s used — or as we might say, “it’s not the brush so much as the hand that holds it.” The fact remains, after first flossing, a manual toothbrush can be quite effective in removing plaque if you brush once or twice a day with a soft-bristle brush using a gentle brushing motion.

Although a powered toothbrush does much of the work for you, it still requires training to be effective, just as with a manual toothbrush. We would encourage you, then, to bring your toothbrush, powered or manual, on your next cleaning visit: we would be happy to demonstrate proper technique and give you some useful tips on making your brushing experience more effective.

Remember too: brushing your teeth and flossing isn’t the whole of your oral hygiene. Although a critical part, brushing and flossing should also be accompanied with semi-annual professional cleanings to ensure the removal of as much disease-causing plaque as possible.

If you would like more information on types of toothbrushes, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Manual vs. Powered Toothbrushes.”


DentalImplantsRequireCleaningandMaintenanceJustLikeNaturalTeeth

There’s no doubt dental implants are an effective choice for restoring both the form and function of missing teeth. But although they aren’t susceptible to tooth decay as with natural teeth, the bone and gum tissues that surround them are. Implants, therefore, require the same cleaning and maintenance as natural teeth.

A dental implant is actually a root replacement, a titanium post surgically imbedded in the jawbone. Because titanium is osteophilic (“bone-loving”), bone will naturally grow around it, making the implant more secure over time. Atop the implant is an abutment to which an artificial crown, the visible portion of the implant, is attached. The abutment is surrounded and supported by connective fibers within the gum tissue that hold the tissue against the implant surface.

This attachment differs significantly from natural teeth’s attachment to the jawbone, which attach to a tooth’s root through the periodontal ligament. The tiny fibers of the ligament hold teeth in place; its elasticity allows for tiny adjustments in a tooth’s position in response to changes in other teeth and bone. The ligament is also rich in blood supply that enriches the area with nutrients and provides resources to fight and resist infection.

An implant doesn’t have this same degree of defense against infection. Without proper hygiene, a layer of bacterial plaque known as biofilm can develop on the crown surface of both natural teeth and restorations. In addition, an infectious condition specific to implants known as peri-implantitis can set in the gum tissues surrounding the implant. This can lead to bone loss (sometimes very rapid) and eventual loss of the implant.

Although your daily hygiene won’t require special toothbrushes or other devices for implant cleaning, your professional cleanings will. The metal instruments (known as curettes) used to clean natural teeth could damage implant surfaces. The hygienist will use devices made of plastic or resin rather than metal, and nylon or plastic sheaths or tips on ultrasonic equipment that are specially designed for implant cleaning.

While maintaining dental implants requires diligence on both your part and ours, implants remain an effective, long-term choice for dental restoration. In fact, some studies indicate upwards of 95% success rate. Proper hygiene will greatly increase your chances for many years of service from your implants.

If you would like more information on properly maintaining your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”


By Dyer Family Dentistry
January 16, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tmj  
ChronicJawPainWhattodoAboutTMJDisorders

Many people suffer from problems with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ); this can result in chronic pain and severely limit the function of the jaw. Yet exactly what causes the problems, how best to treat them… and even the precise number of people affected (estimates range from 10 million to 36 million) are hotly debated topics.

There are, however, a few common threads that have emerged from a recent survey of people who suffer from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD). Some of them are surprising: For example, most sufferers are women of childbearing age. And two-thirds of those surveyed say they experienced three or more associated health problems along with TMJD; these include fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic headaches, depression, and sleep disturbances. The links between these threads aren’t yet clear.

The survey also revealed some interesting facts about treating TMJD. One of the most conservative treatments — thermal therapy (hot or cold compresses) — was found by 91% to offer the most effective relief of symptoms. By contrast, the most invasive treatment├ó??surgery├ó??was a mixed bag: A slightly higher percentage reported that surgery actually made the condition worse compared to those who said it made them better.

So what should you do if you think you may have TMJD? For starters, it’s certainly a good idea to see a dentist to rule out other conditions with similar symptoms. If you do have TMJD, treatment should always begin with some conservative therapies: moist heat or cold packs, along with over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications if you can tolerate them. Eating a softer diet, temporarily, may also help. If you’re considering more invasive treatments, however, be sure you understand all the pros and cons — and the alternatives — before you act. And be sure to get a second opinion before surgery.

If you would like more information about temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD), call our office for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Chronic Jaw Pain And Associated Conditions” and “Seeking Relief from TMD.”


By Dyer Family Dentistry
January 14, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: invisalign   Elizabethtown  
Elizabethtown InvisalignUnlike traditional wire and bracket braces that are bulky and uncomfortable, Invisalign straightens your teeth using a series of clear, customized, removable appliances called aligners. It’s virtually invisible, which means hardly anyone will know that you’re straightening your teeth.  Take the next step to an attractive smile with Invisalign clear aligners.  Choosing to straighten your teeth as an adult is a big decision, as it will affect not only your appearance, but your lifestyle as well.  With Invisalign in Elizabethtown, you can alter your teeth without altering your life.
 

Enjoy the Benefits of Invisalign Treatment in Elizabethtown

 
Invisalign features a host of benefits. For one, Invisalign is virtually undetectable. That means you can go through treatment without anyone even noticing. Invisalign is also removable. You can conveniently take out your trays to brush your teeth, floss, eat dinner or even for a special occasion. As long as you are wearing the aligners for the required amount of time each day, you are free to remove the trays as you need to. And since you can remove your aligners, you can eat what you want without having to worry about breaking a wire or bracket.
 
Another benefit of Invisalign is its comfort.  While abrasive wire braces can irritate your cheeks and mouth, thin Invisalign trays are smooth and gentle on the oral tissues. With Invisalign, there's decreased risk of lost braces, broken wires, cuts and abrasions that can happen inside the mouth.
 

Enjoy Straighter Teeth and Improved Oral Hygiene

 
A more attractive smile is a great motivator for undergoing treatment, but beyond the cosmetic advantages, there are also many important, long-lasting health benefits of straight teeth.  A straight smile improves dental function, helping you chew, bite and speak more effectively.  With proper alignment, balanced forces on your teeth can reduce the incidence of damaging dental habits such as grinding or clenching. 
 
In addition, crooked, crowded teeth are also difficult to floss and brush.  As a result, plaque can easily accumulate between teeth and along the gum line, leading to a higher risk of cavities and periodontal disease.  Since straight teeth are easier to clean, the gum tissue will have less plaque and debris that cause inflammation, decay and gum disease.
 
Ready to take the next step in looking and feeling your very best?  Talk to Dr. Marc Dyer, our dentist serving Radcliff and Elizabethtown, for more information on Invisalign, and to see if it is an appropriate solution for straightening your smile. 

By Dyer Family Dentistry
January 08, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: antibiotic  
CertainMedicalConditionsCallforAntibioticsBeforeaDentalVisit

If you have certain health conditions, your medical doctor may prescribe an antibiotic for you to take prior to a dental visit. The reason why is a story that dates back to the mid-20th Century.

In the early part of the last century, a theory became popular that bacteria in the mouth could migrate to other parts of the body and cause systemic illness or disease. During the 1930s and 1940s evidence arose that indicated a connection between dental procedures that caused bleeding and two serious health conditions: bacteremia (the presence of bacteria in the bloodstream) and infective endocartitis. The latter is the inflammation of inner tissues of the heart (including the valves) caused by infectious agents, most notably bacteria. It became common then to prescribe antibiotics to patients susceptible to these conditions as a preventive measure. Later, patients with prosthetic joints or poor immune systems were added for this kind of treatment.

For many years, the American Heart Association (AHA) recommended pre-visit antibiotic treatment for a wide array of heart patients. After several years of research that indicated the treatment wasn't necessary for most people and might even be detrimental, they updated their guidelines in 2007 and reduced their recommendation list to just a few conditions. They now recommend the antibiotic treatment for patients with artificial heart valves, a history of infective endocartitis, heart transplant recipients with valve problems, and certain congenital (inherited) heart conditions.

If you have a condition that calls for a pre-visit antibiotic treatment, all the providers involved with your care will need to communicate. Your medical doctor will most likely prescribe two grams of amoxicillin (or a similar antibiotic if you are allergic to amoxicillin) that you would take an hour before the dental procedure. We in turn would communicate with your medical doctor concerning the dental procedures you're scheduled to undergo (including regular cleanings), in case your doctor would like to make adjustments in your medication.

Your health and well-being is of utmost importance to all your healthcare providers, medical and dental. Working together, we can ensure the dental procedures you need for oral health won't have an adverse impact your general health.

If you would like more information on antibiotic treatment before a dental visit, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Antibiotics for Dental Visits.”




Contact Us

Dyer Family Dentistry

270-769-3990
804 N Mulberry St Elizabethtown, KY 42701-1922