(270) 769-3990
804 N Mulberry St Elizabethtown, KY 42701-1922

Posts for: November, 2013

By Dyer Family Dentistry
November 26, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crown  
ACrowningAchievementNatural-LookingTeeth

You've taken good care of your teeth all your life, with brushing, flossing and regular visits to the dentist. But chances are that someday (or maybe even now) you may be told that you need a restoration on one or more of your teeth. Oftentimes, that means a crown.

But what exactly is a crown, and why is it used? We're glad you asked!

In the course of time, natural teeth may need to be restored for a variety of reasons. As we age, our teeth may eventually become chipped or discolored. They can become weak and prone to cracking, or actually break due to tooth decay or trauma. Treating tooth decay may require a filling so large that there isn't much tooth surface left. Or, getting a dental implant (which replaces the roots of the tooth) means that you will need a replacement for the visible part of the tooth as well.

A crown (sometimes called a cap) is a common type of dental restoration. It's a way of replacing the tooth structure, in part or in full. A crown can cover the whole visible portion of the tooth, right down to the gum line. Since it's custom-made just for you, it is designed to fit in and function just like the rest of your teeth. And because it's composed of an extremely hard substance (gold, porcelain, ceramic, or some combination of these materials) it's made to last for a long time.

If a dental examination shows that you need a crown, here's how the process works: First, any decay is removed from the affected tooth, and it is prepared for restoration. Then, a 3-D replica of the tooth (and adjacent teeth) is made. This model is used to create a crown that matches your natural teeth. If you're getting a tooth-colored crown, the exact shade of the adjacent teeth will be duplicated as closely as possible.

After the crown has been fabricated, the tooth is made ready to receive the restoration. The crown is adjusted to mesh perfectly with the prepared tooth, and to function with the whole bite. Then, it is cemented or bonded into place. When it's all done, it can be hard to tell that you had any dental work done at all.

If you're thinking that it's a challenge to make an “artificial” tooth fit in with your natural teeth, you're right — but we do it all the time! Creating a superb-looking restoration is a blend of science and art. It takes a careful eye to match tooth colors and to adjust biting surfaces and spacing for a perfect fit. But when experienced dental professionals and patients work together, the results can make us both proud of the achievement.

If you would like more information about crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers” and “Gold or Porcelain Crowns.”


By Dyer Family Dentistry
November 18, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: braces   orthodontics  
StraighteningYourChildsTeethWhenisthebesttimetostart

All parents want their child to have an attractive smile and good strong healthy teeth; but it may be difficult for parents to know if their young children's teeth are coming in the way they should. Parents may not know that it is also important that the upper and lower jaws need to be in proper alignment for a properly functioning bite.

As a child's permanent teeth come in, the teeth may be too crowded, or they may have spaces between them that are too large. They can have protruding teeth, extra or missing teeth, or problems with jaw growth. Sometimes children have malocclusions (“mal” – bad; “occlusion” – bite) that were caused by thumb sucking or other problems. If you wait to seek treatment until all of the child's permanent teeth have come in, and facial and jaw growth are nearly complete, correction of problems will be more difficult and the potential to encourage jaw growth in a positive direction may be lost.

When a little can go a long way

Whether a malocclusion is obvious or not it is important to have an orthodontic evaluation at an early age. Experts advise having an orthodontic evaluation some time before the age of 7. At 7, a child's permanent (adult) teeth have begun to come in but they still have some primary (baby) teeth left. If necessary, it's a good time to intercept and make a big difference for a little treatment.

Treatment that begins while a child's teeth are erupting or coming in, is called “interceptive orthodontics.” It provides an opportunity for the best results in orthodontic treatment. It can also include working with the child's facial growth and jaw development to assure that the upper and lower jaws align together effectively. It can often be done with simple removable appliances rather than full braces.

Orthodontics (“ortho” – straight; “odont” – tooth) is a sub-specialty of dentistry that is devoted to the study and treatment of malocclusions. Your general or pediatric dentist may recommend that our child consult with an orthodontist. Orthodontists are dentists who specialize in the growth and development of the teeth and jaws, as well as directing proper growth by moving the teeth into correct position.

Come to see us early for an orthodontic evaluation, while it's still easy to make a big improvement in your child's future smile.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about orthodontia in children. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Early Orthodontic Evaluation.” Or the article “The Magic of Orthodontics.”


By Dyer Family Dentistry
November 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: fluoride  
BeAwareofYourFamilysFluorideIntaketoAvoidStaining

It’s indisputable that fluoride has revolutionized dental care. Decades of research have overwhelming shown this natural, enamel-strengthening chemical has decreased tooth decay.

Too much fluoride, though, can cause enamel fluorosis, a permanent staining of tooth enamel. In its mildest form, the teeth develop faint whitish streaks; in more severe cases, the staining is noticeably darker and the teeth appear pitted. The teeth themselves aren’t damaged, but the unsightly staining could require cosmetic treatment. Children under age 9 (when permanent teeth enamel matures) are especially at risk of fluorosis due to over-fluoridation.

Because of fluoride’s prevalence in hygiene products and many drinking water supplies, it’s not always easy to know if your child is receiving too much. There are two areas, though, that bear watching.

First, you should limit the serving quantity of fluoride hygiene products, particularly toothpaste. Children tend to swallow rather than spit out toothpaste after brushing, so they ingest more fluoride. We recommend a small “smear” of toothpaste on the brush for children under two, and a pea-sized amount for children two to four.

The other concern is your drinking water. Three-quarters of America’s water systems add fluoride, usually to a recommended level of 0.70 PPM (parts per million). To know if your water supply adds fluoride and at what levels, you can contact your local water utility or health department, or check the Center for Disease Control’s website for their “My Water’s Fluoride” program (http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/MWF/Index.asp). This site will have information if your water system participates in the program.

If your area exceeds recommended levels or is at high risk for fluorosis, we recommend reducing the use of tap water in infant formula. Besides breast-feeding (human breast milk is low in fluoride), you can use either ready-to-feed formula, or mix powdered formula with water specifically labeled “de-ionized,” “purified,” “de-mineralized,” or “distilled.”

One thing you should not do is eliminate your use of products containing fluoride — this may increase your child’s risk of tooth decay. The consequences of decay can be serious and have a life-long effect — and far outweigh the risks of fluorosis staining.

If you would like more information on fluoride and your infant, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Development and Infant Formula.”


November 14, 2013
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Our food drive continues.  Please continue to bring non-perishables to the office!


By Dyer Family Dentistry
November 12, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Elizabethtown KY Dental ImplantsTooth loss can occur for various reasons including neglecting your teeth and gums with a poor diet and improper oral hygiene.  Athletes are more prone to lose teeth, as well, because they experience increased trauma and contact the mouth.  When tooth loss occurs, it can also have a substantial impact on a person’s self-esteem due to the aesthetic implications. 
 
A shift in your teeth can cause your teeth to become crooked, and gapped, creating an older appearance.  The consequences of poor dental health can make it difficult to eat our favorite foods and even speak, causing embarrassment and frustration.  Dental implants are natural in appearance, allowing others to only notice your beautiful, natural smile. With help from Dr. Marc Dyer in Elizabethtown, dental implants can restore your smile.
 

Understanding the Advantages of Dental Implants from Elizabethtown Dentist, Dr. Dyer

 
If you, like millions of adults, have lost one or more teeth, then you understand the unpleasant consequences that accompany tooth loss. Missing teeth result in an older appearance, discomfort, inconvenience and an overall less productive lifestyle.
 
Since dental implants are securely attached, you gain confidence to eat what you like, speak clearly and freedom from embarrassment. Other benefits of implants include:
 
  • Improved Appearance: Dental implants look and feel just like your own teeth.
  • Improved Comfort: Dental Implants are securely anchored, so there is no slipping as there is with dentures. This eliminates some of the key inconveniences of dentures, including poor fit, gum irritation, and pain.
  • Improved Health: Dental implants can help prevent deterioration of the jawbone caused by loss of teeth, so your face retains its natural shape. 
  • Durability: Dental Implants are strong and can last a lifetime with proper care.
  • Convenience: Unlike dentures, dental implants are permanent, eliminating the inconvenience of removing your dentures. With dental implants, you can brush and care for your teeth just as you would your natural teeth. 
 

Dr. Dyer Shares: Proper Nutrition and Diet Help Save Your Teeth

 
It is extremely important to watch what you eat, as it helps in the maintenance of your teeth and in disease prevention.  Ongoing research indicates that antioxidants and other nutrients found in fruits, vegetables and nuts may strengthen immunity and improve your body’s ability to fight bacteria and inflammation, which can help protect the teeth and gums.  Follow these tips on maintaining proper nutrition and keeping your smile:
 
  • Calcium and vitamin D supplements decrease the risk for tooth loss in the elderly.
  • Antioxidant vitamins such as vitamin C, and other nutrients from fruits and vegetables help protect gums and other tissues from cell damage and bacterial infection.
  • Folic acid promotes healthy mouths and supports cell growth.
  • Eating sugary carbohydrate-rich foods as part of a balanced meal is better than eating them alone. 
  • Foods that take a long time to chew can damage teeth.
  • Cheese unleashes a burst of calcium that mixes with plaque and sticks to the teeth, which protects your teeth from acids that cause decay.
 
If you’ve lost one or more of your natural teeth, it’s possible to continue to live confidently with dental implants from your dentist in Elizabethtown, Dr. Marc Dyer. Dental implants look and feel exactly like your natural teeth, and unlike conventional restoration solutions, implants can last a lifetime.
 
If you are missing teeth, how did you lose your tooth?  Share your story below!



Contact Us

Dyer Family Dentistry

270-769-3990
804 N Mulberry St Elizabethtown, KY 42701-1922